Archive for Streaming Video – Page 2

Reflections on the MIE Media State of the Union session

family watching TVIn the Industry State of the Union session at the 2018 Media Insights and Engagement Conference, panelists were asked to share with the audience one takeaway from the current circumstances of the industry.

Click on this link to see my summaries of the takeaways along with some commentary, via one of my guest blog posts for the conference – Reflections on The Media Insights State of the Union

Other MIE conference posts

Please note these posts were originally to be posted during the MIE conference itself but are being published on delay by the conference organizers. Other of my guest blog posts from this year’s conference include…

David Tice is the principal of TiceVision LLC, a media research consultancy.
Get notifications of new posts – sign up at right or at bottom of this page.

Exploring the Viewer Data Value Exchange

Turner Networks logoAt the 2018 Media Insights and Engagement Conference, Turner Networks shared some interesting research into consumers’ attitudes towards viewer data value and how consumers can be empowered to share their data in a relationship with a network. The two main areas covered by Turner in their talk were curation and serendipity.

Click on this link to see my thoughts on this presentation via one of my guest blog posts for the conference – Exploring the Viewer Data Value Exchange

Other of my conference posts

Please note these posts were originally to be posted during the conference itself but are being published on delay by the conference organizers. Other of my guest blog posts from this year’s conference include…

David Tice is the principal of TiceVision LLC, a media research consultancy.
Get notifications of new posts – sign up at right or at bottom of this page.

Mister Rogers and Twitch: Didn’t see that coming

Twitch logoI have to say I’ve had a hard time getting my head around yesterday’s announcement that Amazon’s Twitch streaming service will start offering the full catalog of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood episodes. Twitch, best known as the place to watch over people’s virtual shoulders as they play videogames, seems just by its name to be the antithesis of Mister Rogers’ calm and  soothing demeanor. But perhaps that’s the point?

Mr Rogers' Neighborhood logoBeing well outside the demo for Twitch (probably by about 40 years!), I can’t speak to personal use; and my son is just a bit to old to have had Twitch around when he was into his teenage videogame phase. But what I do know about Twitch – aside from an audience size which gets marketers salivating and that prompted Amazon to buy it – is that along with acceptable content there have been issues both with content and with toxic behavior by the players it streams.

This isn’t the first time Twitch has “broadcast” a mellow callback to a simpler time. In 2015, it had a Bob Ross Joy of Painting marathon, which was well received by Twitch users. Again, Ross’ very mellow and deliberate delivery seems the antithesis to the constant action of most of the content on Twitch’s “channels.”

With the majority of Twitch users being under 35, the odds are that Twitch users watching Mister Rogers (or Bob Ross) are doing so more for ironic viewing or as sources for new memes – certainly the original target demo for Neighborhood was young children rather than young adults. But maybe there will be an appreciation among some of the viewers of not only Mister Rogers’ “be nice” philosophy, but of a media that was slower, kinder, and calmer than the often shrill and overly kinetic content seen today on TV, streaming, and social media.

Happy Birthday!

With his 90th birthday actually falling today, March 20, there is a groundswell of interest in Fred Rogers, 15 years after his death and 17 years after filming the last episode of his Neighborhood. I touched on this increase in interest in a post from early this year when one of a couple of new documentaries was announced, and later news includes a feature film in development starring Tom Hanks as Fred Rogers.

image of Tim Gunn in a sweater

Gunn even gets Rogers’ sweater look

Tom Hanks certainly seems to fits the persona of Mister Rogers. But after my previous post, I pondered who might be a “new” Mister Rogers (not that Fred could ever really be replaced, but you get the point). While Hanks did occur to me, I finally settled on Tim Gunn from Project Runway. He seems like such a nice person, he is always positive and supportive, and has empathy for others. Plus, as a bonus you get the inclusiveness angle that in today’s world, it’s perfectly acceptable that a gay man could step into a similar role as Mister Rogers.

Who would YOU suggest as a “new” Mister Rogers? Let us know in the comments section!

David Tice is the principal of TiceVision LLC, a media research consultancy.
Get notifications of new posts – sign up at right or at bottom of this page.

Stretching Viewers and the Conundrum of TV Reboots

image of man watching TV

via Tookapic, CC0 License

At the 2018 Media Insights and Engagement Conference, Grant McCracken discussed the imperative for the TV/premium business to help “stretch” viewers from “old TV” to “new TV.” Not to necessarily move them all into “new TV,” but to find the “missing” middle ground which appeals to enthusiasts of both ends of that spectrum. And how does this fit in with the current spate of TV reboots?

Click on this link to see my notes on his presentation via another one of my guest blog posts for this year’s conference – Stretching Viewers and the Conundrum of Reboots

Other of my conference posts

Please note these posts were originally to be posted during the conference itself but are being published on delay by the conference organizers. Other of my guest blog posts from this year’s conference include Ad Experiments in Musical Sing for NBC Will Control of Data Control the Future of Media? , and Making Peak TV Peakier .

David Tice is the principal of TiceVision LLC, a media research consultancy.
Get notifications of new posts – sign up at right or at bottom of this page.

Streaming expansion leads to Fox News extension

Fox Nation logoIn a true sign that streaming has gone mainstream, even with the older generations, Fox News announced a new OTT service last week called Fox Nation. Without generalizing too broadly, the Fox News Channel (FNC) audience is typically older and are late-comers to the world of streaming – but recent years have seen the adoption of streaming accelerate in this cohort.

As happened with younger consumers, the increasing ease of configuring connected TVs, as well as signing up for and using streaming services, has seen adoption and usage among older consumers rapidly increase. Enabled by smart TVs (no need to worry about connecting other boxes to get internet content) and emboldened by use of Netflix or Amazon Prime (subscriptions given as birthday or holiday gifts), older viewers are entering prime time for OTT and SVOD services that cater to their interests.

For example, The Home Technology Monitor from GfK* showed that in the two years between Spring 2015 and Spring 2017, the proportion of homes with a householder age 50+ with an operational connected TV set increased by one fifth. And Nielsen’s Total Audience Report showed that usage by time of streaming video (not including smart TVs) among those age 50+ increased about 30 percent in the year between Q2 2016 and Q2 2017.

Smartly the new Fox Nation service doesn’t cannibalize the main network, which potential subscribers may watch all the time anyway. Fox Nation won’t feature simulcast or current programs shown on the FNC “mothership.” It will supposedly take deep dives via exclusive content and events, as well as offer over 20 years’ worth of FNC archive content.

Looking more broadly, the different demos within the older streaming crowd should be ripe for other OTT services marketed in a way that is friendly to the older viewer. Obviously the flip side of Fox Nation would be a liberal-oriented OTT service. PBS stations rolled out Passport in the past year, which offers exclusive streaming content to supporters of a certain donation level. The PBS crowd should also have an interest in services like Acorn or Britbox that offer a lot of programs from the UK not normally available on PBS or other outlets.

The age of affluence

As CBS’ David Poltrack has been pointing out for years, older viewers have a disposable income that is valuable – not just to OTT services looking for subscribers, but to the advertisers or sponsors on those services. Given the high average age of its audience, perhaps it’s no coincidence that CBS All Access was the first – and still only – stand-alone SVOD service offered by one of the Big Four broadcasters.

*Disclosure: the author ran The Home Technology Monitor between 1995 and 2017, and was employed by GfK until October 2017

David Tice is the principal of TiceVision LLC, a media research consultancy.
Get notifications of new posts – sign up at right or at bottom of this page.

Ad Experiments Sing for NBC

Click on this link to see one of my guest blog posts from this year’s Media Insights & Entertainment conference – Ad Experiments in Musical Sing for NBC.

Please note these posts are delayed due to issues with the conference website; they were originally to be posted during the conference itself. Look for several more posts from the 2018 conference over the next few days – updates via my twitter feed or via the conference twitter.

David Tice is the principal of TiceVision LLC, a media research consultancy.
Get notifications of new posts – sign up at right or at bottom of this page.

Scenes from the CIMM Summit

CIMM logoThe following are some quick notes and comments I jotted down from CIMM’s Cross-Platform Media Measurement & Data Summit (CIMM = Coalition for Innovative Media Measurement). The CIMM Summit was held February 1st at the Time Warner Center in New York City, and was well attended by the movers and shakers of the media research world.

Presentations and videos of some or all of the presentations should be available soon on CIMM’s website, cimm-us.org.

Notes and Comments

Opening with Jane Clarke, CEO of CIMM
Jane reviewed CIMM’s manifesto and progress made in the past year. [I think how actual much progress will depend on one’s viewpoint (buyer, seller, vendor, or MRC (Media Ratings Council)]

Fireside Chat with Rishad Tobaccowala, Publicis
– he believes there will be a 20-30% reduction in impression-based advertising in the next few years
– “data connecting to data” is the next level of connectivity
– advertising has been in the segmentation business (breaking up large audiences); it’s now entering the aggregation business (collecting smaller, fragmented audiences to create reach)

Buyers and Sellers Speak Out (panel)
– highly entertaining panel!
– Cost per rating point (getting a program in front of a viewer) for ad-supported content is skyrocketing (Joe Marchese, FOX)
– Data about viewers of an ad impression are quickly becoming almost more valuable than the impact of the impression itself (Lou Paskalis, Bank of America)
– You cannot create the same reach of a Super Bowl ad with digital, even if you had a year [assuming full viewing of ad] (Marchese)
– We are now being forced to create valuable, engaging marketing content (Paskalis)

CIMM Attribution Provider Comparison Study (panel)
– Attribution models are like Christmas trees; you can turn them to look good and hide the bare spots (Newcombe Clark, AIG)

Disney-ABC Multiplatform TV Attribution, Phase 2
– There are three main drivers to multiplatform ROI: Audience size, consumer commitment to content, and consumer perception of quality (Cindy Davis, Disney/ABC). [this was highly quantitative but very reminiscent of survey-based work we did at Knowledge Networks in early/mid 2000s]
– “Smarts”, “edge”, and “relatability” are the three of the eight Magid Emotional DNA attributes that are best indicators of multiplatform ROI
– Report supposedly available at ABCAllAccess.com

Creating a Data Relationship with TV Viewers (Channel 4, UK)
– An audience analysis that was interesting if not particularly groundbreaking
– Did show some very cool personalized ads served on digital streaming
– Trying to sell on “ABC”: Audience demos, Behavioral info, Content/Context (building ads or pods related to the content being viewed)

Coffee Break

Industry Associations Speak Out (panel)
– “Muscle memory” [mentioned several times earlier in the day as a reason why various stakeholders don’t adopt new methods] is a good thing, because we need to consider both legacy standards and all viewers [eg, measurement needs to include all viewers, even those still watching VCRs, not just who consumes digital content] (George Ivie, Media Ratings Council)
– We as an industry need “TED Talks” to discuss marketing successes, not just continual talk about the challenges we are facing. (Bob Liodice, ANA)
– We eventually will need MRC audit and accreditation of sales or brand lift providers. If we are validating the data going in, then the loop should be closed by accrediting the lift calculations (Ivie)

Who’s Getting It Right? (panel)
– We need progress not perfection (Kate Sirkin, Publicis)
– Gaps that need to be filled:
— Complete multiplatform system, both pipes and data (Brian Hughes, MAGNA)
— Vendors need to take the time to understand our business to know what the business questions are (Lisa Heimann, NBC)
— Measuring attention or engagement, Magid’s Emotional DNA doesn’t scale. (Howard Shimmel, Turner)
— Be prepared to validate your methods (Daniel Slotwiner, Facebook)
— Transparency and validation. Measurement is now a team sport (Elissa Lee, Google)

Programmatic TV (panel)
– It still takes a long time to evaluate a campaign, up to six months (Dan Aversano, Turner)
– We could use a quick read on campaigns using proxy data (Greg Pharo, Coca-Cola)
– If you make one [national] ad addressable, then the whole program can’t be C3 rated by Nielsen’s rules (Aversano)
– There are too many layers, each with their hand out for a piece of the pie; this can force us to do what we CAN rather than what we would LIKE (Mike Bologna, One2One Media)
– Cycle times are becoming more and more compressed between pitch, sale, and execution (Aversano)

Is the TV Industry Ready for Ad Ratings?
– Results of 27 interviews with industry leaders by Artie Bulgrin
– In 1987, the PeopleMeter came on; 2009 C3 ratings; 2017 separate measures of content and of ads
– Having a standard cross-platform currency is seen as important but NOT critical
– Having an accurate measure of net reach and duplication IS seen as critical but doesn’t have to be “currency quality”

David Tice is the principal of TiceVision LLC, a media research consultancy.
Get notifications of new posts – sign up at right or at bottom of this page.

Making Peak TV Peakier

Please click on this link to see my first guest blog for this year’s Media Insights & Entertainment conference –  Making Peak TV Peakier

MIE conference logo

Don’t miss this key media conference… There is still a chance to save an additional $100 this week – use code LASTCHANCE here.

 

David Tice is the principal of TiceVision LLC, a media research consultancy.
Get notifications of new posts – sign up at right or at bottom of this page.

SVODs can’t skip their churn

tablet with SVOD service appsThe Wall Street Journal highlights a story that really shouldn’t surprise anyone with experience in media business – a high level of SVOD subscribers only sign up for the months in which their favorite series are released. “Churn” has been around along as HBO or other premium channels have existed. But, it does seem to bring surprise to SVOD/OTT companies and digital investors who again may have skipped over a lesson which traditional TV has for them.

That churn is at all a surprise is almost as laughable as a recent conference marketing piece. This promotes a keynote by an SVOD representative who will discuss how “TV is becoming the center of our culture.” Becoming??? I realize SVOD companies are young, but do they really have no idea that TV has been the primary shaper of culture since the late 1950s? But I digress…

One of the main drawbacks of the “full season release” strategy in use by many SVOD services is there is no incentive to stay around longer than the month of release. By enabling total bingeing, these services also make it easy for their subs to watch a whole season over one weekend. And if the subs are willing to wait, they can knock off several series in one month. As our local ShopRite stores used to say, “why pay more?”.

Perhaps not by coincidence, Amazon announced last week that it was raising the one-month Prime subscription by 20 percent (keeping the annual subscription the same). Although not directly mentioned, this move no doubt is at least a partial reaction to people dipping into Prime Video month-by-month.

Churn, churn, churn

A certain number of people will always search out ways to reduce their costs. Others can’t be bothered and keep subscriptions forever, even when it’s not being used – making the subscription model work. The digital media services will need to learn to live with this, just like old media has had to for many decades.

David Tice is the principal of TiceVision LLC, a media research consultancy.
Get notifications of new posts – sign up at right or at bottom of this page.

Frequency capping and connected TV

Roku stick and remote controlThere is a nice article published yesterday on AdExchanger.com about the issues with frequency capping in ads served to connected TVs. This is an issue I’ve mentioned in discussions with clients over the past year, strictly on an anecdotal level as a (then-new) owner of a Roku-enabled TV set.

Being my first experience with a Roku-enabled device, I was fascinated by the hundreds (or maybe it’s thousands) of channels in the long tail of Roku. Of course there are the channels for all the major video publishers, but then there are others for smaller services. Some of these small fry are “studios” presumably distributing content no one else picks up (EndemolShine has one), some use licensed content (every old, bad movie seems to be available) and some are specialty channels that use content that seems filmed by a high school AV class.

Anyway, the salient point is that aside from the channels run by TV networks, the remainder of the Roku channels seem to have a willy-nilly approach to serving ads. In particular, my pain point of frequency. I got so tired of seeing the same ads over and over – in the same piece of content – that I sat down once and counted. In one random viewing session that was 90 minutes long on the same Roku channel, there were six commercial pods. In these six pods, there was one ad that played all six times, another that played five times, and another that played four times. Trust me, these brands were not building much equity with me because I was sick of seeing them!

As a professional in the business, I know this strictly isn’t the fault of the brands themselves but rather the ad tech system lying behind each channel. But like a “civilian,” I don’t much care about whose fault it is, the brands bear the brunt of my annoyance.

The AdExhanger article does a good job of delving into the factors that are contributing to these issues – multiple firms serving ads, differences in how frequency is counted, the inability to count frequency for some devices, and little cooperation in sharing data between firms – and the efforts to try to mitigate this issue and perhaps eventually resolve it.

Digital’s promise and reality at odds again

Like so much to do with digital media – audience measurement, targeting personalized ads, and so on – the promise of delivering ads to connected TVs in the most optimal way for audiences exceeds capabilities. In the meantime, the audience suffers through not just the annoyance of pre-roll and mid-roll interruptions, but being hit over the head with the same creative multiple times.  Will improvement evolve or will the audience just have to grimace and bear it?

David Tice is the principal of TiceVision LLC, a media research consultancy.
Get notifications of new posts – sign up at right or at bottom of this page.